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TIL: ARM Has Java Bytecode Execution in Hardware

I recently purchased a Raspberry Pi. While poking around in /proc I discovered that java is one of the features of the ARM processor in the Pi. It turns out that some ARM models have Java bytecode instructions implemented in hardware.

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